Tuesday, August 26, 2008

New Thing #228--Word Of The Day

I love reading the Urban Dictionary. It's a slang dictionary that anyone can add to. According to the site, there have been 3,254,545 definitions submitted since 1999. Although I like to browse the entries, I don't incorporate them into my vocabulary. However, today I used a word from the Urban Dictionary, and added to its definition.

My new vocabulary word was destinesia, (a combination of destination and amnesia) which is defined as:
  1. When you get to where you're going and forgot why you went there, or

  2. The act of spawning a new web browser window or tab and immediately forgetting where it is you were going to go, thus instilling a sense of panic as you know it was something very important you needed to do.
The older I get the more I find this happening to me! I often go into the kitchen for something and when I get there I can't remember what it was I needed to get.

As I read the second definition, it made me think of another way I exhibit destinesia. Since anyone can add to the dictionary, I submitted my alternate definition to the editors; I got an e-mail back that my submission is under review. There may be yet another definition for the word soon!

3 comments:

  1. i finally went through and read ALL of your new things :)
    back when i was in junior high i visited my friend who lived in o'fallon, illinois and we did all the touristy stuff in st. louis. i love that city!

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  2. Ah another definition of a junior senior moment; that defining moment in time when you cannot blame it on old age because you are too young but there is no other plausible reason behind it...

    Brilliant new word by the way...

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  3. I love that word and can't wait to read your definition of it. Unfortunately, this "destination amnesia" happens to me quite a bit. Also, these days I find that I can no longer spell as well as I used to. I look at words and they just look wrong. So, I check them in the dictionary. Sometimes I'm right, but not always.

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